After a week of dropping teasers and making the headlines, Yamaha has finally unveiled the 2021 YZF-R7 globally. It’s a replacement for the YZF-R6, which was the company’s supersport model before this brand new one. But, that’s not to say that the R7 was not around already. Back in 1999, only 500 of the original YZF-R7 were produced to gain homologation for World Superbike and Suzuka 8 Hours. This new model pays homage to the icon and is aimed at the more youthful buyer of today.

2021 Yamaha YZF-R7. (Image: Yamaha)

First things first, the new R7 is based on the MT-07, which is powered by a 689cc, liquid-cooled, inline-twin motor that produces 71-bhp of peak power and 67-Nm of peak torque. Further, it’s paired to a six-speed gearbox with a slip and assist function. The CP2 engine gets a new ECU, optimised air intake ducts, as well as a revised exhaust design and idealised fuel injection settings. It even has a 270-degree crankshaft that gives the R7 an uneven firing sequence, just like the MT-07.

The 2021 YZF-R7 makes use of a high tensile steel frame, which brings the total weight down to just 188 kilograms (wet). Yamaha has also employed an aluminium centre brace which contributes towards the bike’s sharp handling performance, thanks to greater torsional rigidity. Other than that, the R7 gets fully adjustable KYB 41mm inverted front forks and a link-type monoshock at the rear, which is adjustable for preload and rebound. Braking duties are handled by twin 298mm discs at the front with radially-mounted 4-piston brake callipers. Yamaha has even thrown in a Brembo radial master cylinder for a greater braking feel.

2021 Yamaha YZF-R7. (Image: Yamaha)

As far as the design is concerned, the R7 sticks to the design language inspired by the legendary YZF-R1. However, it does have a few distinctive elements like the LED projector headlight which sits smack dab in the middle. The clip-on handlebars along with rear-set footpegs add to the sporty appeal of the R7. Moreover, the sharply raked rear-end and large openings at the sides make for an aggressive look overall. Furthermore, the YZF-R7 still gets the twin-eye look upfront, along with an LCD instrument cluster and two colour options – Team Yamaha Blue and Raven Black.

2021 Yamaha YZF-R7. (Image: Yamaha)

As of right now, there’s no concrete information of the YZF-R7 ever making its way down to the subcontinent, but one can stay hopeful. However, do let us know in the comments below if you’d like to see this supersport from the R-Series hit our streets with a bit of blue vengeance.